Monday, March 11, 2013

Monday Morning Inspiration

So many of you are making the most beautiful under things. Sexy, beautiful and comfortable all at the same time. Modern day fashion no longer dictates that our under garments mold us into a  certain shape. We now opt for true support and comfort. The ladies of the late 1920's began to break with the traditional corsets that women had squeezed themselves into for far too long. Although they still wore corsets and girdles, the silhouette was far different than that of only a few years before. It was in the late 1920's that girdles with legs were first introduced, WOO HOO!!!! It would only be a short time until we began to wear pants on a regular basis. I think you'll find this article quite interesting. It's taken from the January/February 2013 issue of The Restorer, published by the Model A Ford Club of America. I was given permission to reprint it and share it with you. Please understand that this is copyrighted material and any reprints can only be done with permission from The Model A Ford Club of America.
Be sure to scroll to the bottom as I am also including some great pattern links.   
If you are interested in making some wonderful flirty little pieces, I found some great links to making vintage style undergarments and negligees.
From Amy Barickman's blog, http://amybarickman.com/blog/ I found this great pdf pattern for these beautiful underpants. This would be great for summer as shorts. You can find the pdf here,   https://amybarickman.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Underthingsareskimpy.pdf


From a very interesting blog, http://sewingvintage.blogspot.ca/, you can find the instructions for making "The Magic Nightgown" pictured below, as well as "The Magic Reversible Kimono."
Have a wonderful Monday and maybe take a moment to say thank you to our lovely ancestors of the 1920's for breaking out and fighting for their freedom and and ours.

4 comments:

  1. That magic nightgown has potential!

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    1. I thought so too and it's easy to draft!

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  2. Thank you first to Paul Poiret who really freed the woment from corset and to Coco Chanel. But may I remind you that at first the woment felt very uneasy without corset to maintain their body ?
    Odile your Parisian faitthfull reader

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    1. Change can be difficult! Thanks Dora.

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