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Monday, January 5, 2015

Monday Morning Inspiration

One of my favorite authors is Edgar Allen Poe. As often as I have read his work, I still keep a dictionary near by as there are so many words that he uses that are sadly no longer a part of, at least the common day English language. Language was used to create subtle differences. The same can be said for sewing techniques. It's easy enough to pleat a full skirt, or just gather it up, but what about cartridge pleating? Cartridge pleating can become a design detail, or it can be used as it was traditionally. Below you see cartridge pleating as a design detail.



Here you see cartridge pleating used to control the fullness over the shoulder.  
You can see cartridge pleats used in graduation gowns and choir robes. The picture below is a great example of how the pleats allow for the fullness, but also keeps the fullness from rising up as it would in traditional gathering.
Below is a different take on a pleating detail that I thought was rather interesting. I think this is a Chanel garment. I love the tiny sequins between each pleat.
Although this is not a vintage garment, it's a great example of how cartridge pleats were used in skirts to control the gathering.
This is a vintage garment. The cartridge pleating gives a very fitted look to the top of the sleeve before it explodes.
You've seen this example before in a pocket inspiration post. A little difficult to wear something this large on the hips, but interesting nonetheless.
I thought this example was especially pretty.
Cartridge pleats used to create cuffs.

Totally avant-garde.
Here are a couple of examples from my own wardrobe.
A little dress with a 1920's vibe.
 Rather than cartridge pleat the fullness, I did a number of gathering rows. This is a much simpler way of achieving basically the same effect.
 The sleeves on this suede jacket are done in the traditional cartridge pleating manner.
 Here you can see all the tiny little tucks.
If you would like to give cartridge pleating a try, I found this website,
http://historicalsewing.com/how-to-sew-cartridge-pleats The explanation is the best that I could find. This is a great tutorial especially if you think that you might want to do a period costume at some point.
And finally, this is not cartridge pleating, but when I was searching for examples, I came across this jacket and I thought the design lines were just so pretty. Thought you might like to see it too :)
Have a wonderful week!
Rhonda



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22 comments:

  1. That is really cool - I'd never really noticed this type of pleating before, and now I have a name to go with it! That last jacket is fabulous!

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    1. This type of pleating had lost favor as it is a little more labor intensive, so you don't see it very often.

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  2. I absolutely love the look of this technique. Why? Because it can be done so easily on a pleater traditionally used for smocking children's clothing. Smocking pleaters make the pleats perfectly and evenly sized. It is a great creative tool and you have given some great examples here of how it can be employed.

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    1. I thought this would be right up your creative alley Bunny :) Happy New Year!!!

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    2. Another item for my wish list - smocking pleater!

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  3. As usual, thanks for the beautiful, fascinating ides.

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  4. Cartridge pleats are especially wonderful for home dec items, too - window treatments in particular. I'll bet they can be used prettily on a lampshade, too. I can see it in my head now... I also love when they are used on the back waist of an otherwise plain dress, creating a bit of a "bustle" like silhouette when you see such a dress in profile. (I was inspired by a woman's dress I saw on the NYC subway wearing a dress with that detail one daya few years ago)

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    1. Cartridge pleating is used a lot in home dec, just on a bigger scale. Wow, would I ever like to see the dress you are referring to. Isn't it funny how good design just stays with you? :)

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  5. I love your inspiration posts - the jacket at the end of this one is especially stunning!

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  6. Some lovely inspiration there!

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  7. Hi Rhonda. That is very effective. You never fail to find inspirational activities. It is a similar principle as for the preparation for smoking.
    Thankyou Rhonda.
    Cathy (New Zealand)

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  8. Not having hips, I am especially drawn to the pockets you showed. Now I have a mission to learn how to make them.

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  9. I had only heard a question last Saturday by one of my sewing buddies what Cartridge Pleating is and now you have shown some wonderful garments that show it so well. Thank you.

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  10. Wonderful eye candy here, with pleating that's lovely to pleating that's dramatic, and everything in between. Thanks for the enjoyment, and the education.

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  11. love this post, thanks for sharing it

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  12. I recognise these cartirudge pleats, they are used in our university convocation ceremony gowns :)

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  13. I have never tried this technique and will now add it to my 2015 goals. Thank you for your link and tireless gifting of your knowledge.

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  14. That last jacket <3 So many inspirations here!!!

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  15. You asked why we read your blog? Posts like this one. Breathtakingly beautiful garments.

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  16. We love your fine couture techniques, they have been lost! We love the vintage styles!!
    Also, do you have a Facebook page?

    Thanks,

    Lorili Design, Inc.

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    1. Thanks! I do have a FB page. Just type in my name and you'll find me.

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